On View> Mexico City installation puts architecture on the sidewalk

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Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Leave it to a pair of Brazilian architects to use reinforced concrete to reinvent small-scale urbanism. While North American designers turn to plywood and recycled palettes to create curbside seating, architects Fernando Falcón and Rodrigo Cerviño of the São Paulo–based practice TACOA Arquitetos shopped for rebar.

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Entitled Jardineira, Falcón and Cerviño’s installation is a cantilevered concrete planter and bench located on the busy Insurgentes Avenue in Mexico City. The work sits outside the architecture gallery LIGA, Space for Architecture on one of the city’s major thoroughfares. Founded in 2011, the gallery focuses on primarily on Latin American practices and Jardineira is the first time that an exhibition has left the 172-square-foot venue and directly addressed the street condition.

The concrete installation mimics the existing street furniture, but with one exception: it tilts, seemingly dislodging itself from the sidewalk. “I knew it would be good when they wanted to bring in a structural engineer,” said architect Wonne Ickx, co-founder of LIGA and the architecture firm Productora.

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City (Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

Jardineira at LIGA by TACOA Arquitetos, Mexico City
(Luis Gallardo, LGM Studio).

An emerging firm, TACOA believes that any work of architecture should serve as a pretext for interacting directly with the city. As their installation illustrates, they do this without abandoning disciplinary rigor or a formal language.

The pair ground their work in the teachings of the Paulista School, the mid-century group of Brazilian architects that included Pritzker Prize–winner Paulo Mendes da Rocha and João Batista Vilanova Artigas. Designs from both architects are included in the current MoMA exhibition Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955–1980While most would associate Brazilian architecture with the swoops of Oscar Niemeyer, the Paulista School embraced the grittier side of architecture with chunky, exposed concrete buildings. Similarly, Falcón and Cerviño find inspiration in the frictions and imperfections of urban life.

Jardineira is on view at LIGA through August.

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