AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

Architecture City Terrain East Environment Sustainability
COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why?

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Andres Jaque)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Andres Jaque)

“Architecture is no longer about sign or form,” Jaque told AN. “It is about social networks, and how materials move through those networks. Architecture is nothing if it doesn’t engage these networks.” The design for COSMO is made from off-the-rack parts that are not altered in anyway as they are assembled on site. They remain as generic as possible so that they can be reused more easily. “We are designing them so that we don’t have to cut them. If we cut them we would be minimizing their reuse potential.” This could mean making something locally, or shipping it globally. It is a rethinking of what something means to be local. Much of COSMO could be made anywhere in the world.

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

The parts are put together with wires, which are also reusable. The novel tectonics of COSMO are derived from the new, specific ways that the generic parts are put together. When the parts are allowed to have life after architecture, they take on 2nd and 3rd lives elsewhere. “It is a new way to relate to the land,” Jaque said, “It is an alternative to consumption. We want to give things more lives. It is a different culture of materiality that we want to bring to PS1.”

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

Irrigations systems have been a recurring theme in Jaque’s work. He sees them as one of the original and most complete, open source knowledge systems. Since the 1940s, the collective intelligence of irrigation systems have been evolving so that anyone can use the technology. This radical way of thinking about objects and their networks is something the Spanish architect has researched extensively over his career, since growing up.

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Andres Jaque)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Andres Jaque)

“My family comes from Madrid but also from Aquitaine in France. Both parts of my family had their lives divided between cities and countryside. In France I remember spending summers looking and playing with the centered pivot irrigation systems that my uncle had in his farm,” said Jaque. “I also saw the way he transformed them and exchange parts of it with his neighbors. I guest it all started with that. It was part of a neighbors-based economy.”

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO is not the first PS1 project to give afterlife to building materials. Past winners such as SO-IL, CODA, HWKN, and Interboro Partners have used ready-made parts that can be re-used after the summer, such as scaffolding, ping-pong tables, skateboard decks, and a host of other objects. “Billion Oyster Pavilion,” one of the 2015 Figment pavilions on Governor’s Island, is specifically designed to be thrown into the New York Harbor later this summer, where it will take on new life as an oyster habitat.

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

COSMO Being assembled at MoMA/PS1 in New York. (Matt Shaw)

According to Jaque, bringing in parts from all over the world is actually better for the environment. This new, global way of producing an architecture is actually more energy-efficient and causes less emissions, due to the sheer volume of freight that a boat can handle compared to a truck. So shipping tires from Turkey is better for the environment than bringing them from somewhere in the U.S., since New York has a harbor. The team also found irrigation pyramids in Spain, where they were more easily procured. The parts are expected to arrive in New York sometime in May, and should be ready for the June 27 opening Warm-Up.

Related Stories