On View> Artist invites viewers to walk through steel at the New Museum’s 2015 Triennial

Art East On View
(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

(Courtesy of Kriska Decor)

Streaming from the ceiling like colored rain, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s steel curtain installation is far less delicate than it appears. Up close, the completely see-through curtain of steel mesh looks like raindrops stitched together, whose straight-down free-fall is punctuated by geometric and and insect-like laser cutouts framed in powder-coated steel.

Mangranne's Steel Curtains at the Frieze Art Fair New York 2014 (Courtesy Kriska Decor)

Mangranne’s Steel Curtains at the Frieze Art Fair New York 2014 (Courtesy Kriska Decor)

(Courtesy of Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

(Courtesy Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

The cutouts are painted in a contrasting look-at-me neon shades against the primary colors of the mesh, and those reaching down to the floor are sufficiently large for the viewer to pass silently through.

In other instances, the cutouts are positioned at eye level, in which case the viewer must walk straight through the mesh, a metallic clinking sound announcing his or her entrance. Half industrial and half handmade, Mangrané’s installation dithers at the intersection of immateriality and corporeality. Such curtains are frequently found in butcher shops and home entrances.

(Courtesy Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

(Courtesy Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

Currently on view through May 24 at the New Museum’s 2015 Triennial: Surround Audience in Manhattan, Mangrané’s curtains operate both as independent sculptures and elements of a larger installation. The installation has migrated to and from various prominent exhibitions, recently generating buzz at the Frieze Art Fair New York 2014 and the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco. Spanish interiors company Kriska Décor produced the mesh curtains for the Spanish born, Brazil-based artist.

(Courtesy Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

(Courtesy Daniel Steegmann Mangrane)

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