Check out these five finalists named in the Mies van der Rohe Awards

Architecture Awards International
Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Five projects have been short-listed in the 2015 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture—Mies van der Rohe Award. Over the next few weeks, jury members will visit each of the five buildings and a winner will be announced on May 8th at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona. You can take a look at the five finalists below.

BIG’s Maritime Museum. (Iwan Baan)

Danish Maritime Museum
Bjarke Ingels Group
Helsingør Denmark

From the architects : The new Danish Maritime Museum is the culmination of a fifteen year vision and master plan to transform Helsingør’s former centuries old shipbuilding harbor that had in days past employed thousands but had since fallen on hard times into the city’s cultural heart celebrating Helsingør’s storied maritime history. The 5,000 m2 subterranean museum is within and built around one of the harbor’s dry docks adjacent to Kronborg Castle of Hamlet fame, thus the dry dock itself forms the centerpiece of the museum’s collection.

Antinori Winery. (Leonardo Finotti)

Antinori Winery. (Leonardo Finotti)

Antinori Winery
Archea Associati
Florence, Italy

From the competition website: A cultured and illuminated customer has made it possible to pursue, through architecture, the enhancement of the landscape and the surroundings as expression of the cultural and social valence of the place where wine is produced.

Ravensburg Art Museum. (Roland Halbe)

Ravensburg Art Museum. (Roland Halbe)

Ravensburg Art Museum
Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei
Ravensburg, Germany

From the architects: We formed a structure with largely closed brick facades, for the sake of optimal protection for the art works. By using recycled brickwork we created a connection between the old buildings and the new construction. In this context we are interested in using recycled building materials as part of a sustainable approach. This results in the self-supporting structure of the roof vault. The building is of the first museums ever built in a passive house standard.

Saw Swee Hock Student Centre. (Dennis Gilbert)

Saw Swee Hock Student Centre. (Dennis Gilbert)

Saw Swee Hock Student Centre, London School of Economics
O’Donnell + Tuomey
London, United Kingdom

From the architects: The proposal was to create an active Student Union, using democratic, everyday, unusual architecture of useful beauty, born out of an understanding of context. The brief was to bring student facilities together under one roof. The multi-functional building includes a venue, pub, learning café, media, prayer, offices, gym, careers, dance studio and social spaces. The brief asked for the “best student building in the UK” and had the aspiration for BREEAM Excellent rating. The design achieved BREEAM Outstanding.

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin
Barozzi / Veiga
Szczecin, Poland

From the architects: The building houses a symphony hall for 1000 spectators, a hall for chamber music for 200 spectators, a multifunctional space for exhibitions and conferences, and a wide foyer. In its materiality, the building is perceived as a light element: the glass facade, illuminated from inside, allows different perceptions. The exterior austerity and the simple composition of the interior circulation spaces contrast with the expressiveness of the main hall and the concert hall with its gold-leaf covering.

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