Shanghai Talks> Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum on balancing dense development with open spaces

Architecture International Skyscrapers Urbanism
Postcard of Park Row, 1895. (courtesy The Skyscraper Museum)

Postcard of Park Row, 1895. (courtesy The Skyscraper Museum)

Last year I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall thinkers I interviewed was Carol Willis of The Skyscraper Museum.

We discussed if there’s an optimum height for tall buildings, and balancing dense development with open spaces.

“You can have places that are characterized as high-rise cities,” she said, “that have opposing models of the way that land is used. The densification of space, the densification of energy…is complemented by the open space, public space, advantages of nature spaces that benefit us all.”

Willis also wondered whether the current Asian boom in very tall buildings has an historical precedent.

“The Chinese cities you see today that are growing their skyscrapers as an image of ambition and identity is very similar to the forces of capitalism that produced the Woolworth Building or the Insurance Company Building,” she said. “What I think is most fundamentally different between the Chinese cities and the American cities at the turn of the century is who controls the land.”

You can read more on CTBUH’s website and share the video from YouTube.

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