With some help from Gensler, ASLA to turn its headquarters into the Center for Landscape Architecture

Architecture East Landscape Architecture Urbanism
The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The new facade. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has tapped Gensler and landscape architecture firm Oehme van Sweden to turn its Washington, D.C. headquarters into the state-of-the-art Center for Landscape Architecture. ASLA bought its 12,000-square-foot home in 1997 for $2.4 million and watched as its value increased to $6.9 million. Since the building was about ready for some fixing up, the society decided it was a good time to go ahead and truly transform it at a cost of $4 million.

(Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

(Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The three-story atrium. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The three-story atrium. (Courtesy Gensler via ASLA)

The building’s existing facade is set to be altered so that the new center is more inviting to passers-by. Inside, the building will be reconfigured to create rooms for meetings and events, exhibitions, a catering kitchen, and restrooms. An existing enclosed double staircase will also be opened to create a three-story atrium that can be dressed up with elements of landscape architecture.

The renovation has something for ASLA’s current (and future) employees as well. The new space comes with an upgraded kitchen and restrooms, new conference rooms and administrative space, and even a “wellness room” and “focus rooms.” Gensler is aiming for LEED Platinum designation with the renovation.

“This is an opportunity to create a facility to reflect the image and ethic of our profession—a world-class Center for Landscape Architecture that will inspire and engage our staff, our membership, allied professionals, public officials and the general public,” said Mark A. Focht, the immediate past president of ASLA, in a statement. ASLA’s board of trustees unanimously approved the plan in November and funding is already a third of the way there. Construction is slated to start this fall.

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