In first year of Vision Zero, NYPD steps up traffic enforcement

East Sustainability Transportation Urbanism
An NYPD officer telling a cab driver about New York City's new speed limit. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

An NYPD officer telling a cab driver about New York City’s new speed limit. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Given the current state of relations between the NYPD and Mayor Bill de Blasio (spoiler: terrible, horrible, no good, very bad), the mayor has been quick to thank the police force for its strong support of Vision Zero—the mayor’s plan to entirely eliminate traffic fatalities in New York City. The effort is obviously an ambitious one, but a year after it went into effect, de Blasio is able to tout some big successes.

One of the pieces of the Vision Zero public awareness campaign. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

One of the many pieces of the Vision Zero public awareness campaign. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The administration recently announced that in 2014, pedestrian fatalities dropped to their lowest level since 1910: 134 deaths, down from 180 the year before. (Two caveats: over the last decade, before Vision Zero was implemented, New York City has seen an overall downward trend in traffic fatalities; and, second, 20 cyclists were killed in 2014, up from 12 the previous year.)

De Blasio’s Vision Zero plan has three main components: reduce the city’s default speed limit, redesign dangerous streets, and curb dangerous driving through increased traffic enforcement. The first of those three can already be checked off the list; last year, New York City’s speed limit was decreased from 30 miles per hour to 25. The second is very much in progress; the city announced that in the first year of Vision Zero, it completed more than 50 major street design projects. And the third big piece of the plan—increasing  enforcement—appears to be in swing as well.

Streetsblog recently went precinct by precinct, crunching NYPD traffic enforcement numbers and found that, for the most part, officers are issuing more tickets for dangerous driving. “Tickets for speeding and failure to yield last year were up 54 percent over the year before, and up 82 percent over 2012′s numbers,” reported the site. “Importantly, the focus of NYPD’s speeding enforcement is shifting somewhat from highways to surface streets, but the pace of change was still very slow in 2014.”

In its first full year, the city’s growing speed camera system also issued 445,000 violations. And failure to yield tickets in 2014 were up 116 percent over the previous year. As Streetsblog noted, the NYPD’s stepped-up traffic enforcement is being felt across the city as every single precinct issued more speeding and failure to yield tickets than it did the year before.

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announcing a street redesign. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announcing a street redesign. (Courtesy NYC DOT)

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