Ribbon cut at Philadelphia’s revamped Dilworth Park

Architecture East Transportation Urbanism
The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (© OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

The ribbon cutting at Dilworth Park. (OLIN / Sahar Coston-Hardy)

Earlier today, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter cut the ribbon on Dilworth Park—a new 120,000-square-foot public space next to City Hall. OLIN led the $55 million renovation of the site which now includes an expansive lawn, a café, new trees and seating, and a nearly 12,000-square-foot fountain that converts into an ice skating rink in the winter.

Pulse by Janet Echelman. (Courtesy Janet Echelman)

“Pulse” by Janet Echelman. (Courtesy Janet Echelman)

The fountain also doubles—rather triples—as a canvas for renowned artist Janet Echelman‘s latest installation. “The serpentine form is meant as an abstract representation of the subways moving deep below the park,” explained Inga Saffron in the Philadelphia Inquirer. “Each time a train pulls in, colored light and puffs of mist will pulse along the sinuous path, symbolizing the constant movement of the city’s transit infrastructure.” The site’s most notable features, though, are likely the two KieranTimberlake-designed glass headhouses that rise out of the plaza providing an architectural flourish and better access points to the trains below.

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