Bright public art installation to light up New York City’s cold, dark winter

Art City Terrain Design East Lighting Newsletter
New York Light and the Flatiron Building. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light and the Flatiron Building. (Courtesy INABA)

The summer is officially over, folks. The beaches are closed, the sun is switching to its seasonal, part-time schedule, and your coworkers are drinking Pumpkin Spice Lattes again. There is no ignoring an inevitable truth: winter is coming and there is nothing you can do about it. Well, if you live up north that is. You could move to Florida, but beyond that, there is nothing you can do about it. For those of us stuck in New York City this holiday season, it’s not all bad news. We will soon be able to feast our frostbitten eyes on a new public art installation in front of the Flatiron Building.

New York Light looking south. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light looking south. (Courtesy INABA)

Today, the Flatiron Partnership and Van Alen Institute announced that New York Light, an installation by architect and designer INABA, has won their first-ever Flatiron Plaza Holiday Design Competition. INABA’s angled structure, which is made of mirrored panels and steel tubes, will frame the Flatiron Building on the south and open up to the Empire State Building to the north. At night, New York Light, it will be illuminated by LEDs.

INABA_New York Light_5

(Courtesy INABA)

“The Flatiron Plaza is one of the few places where it’s possible to truly experience the magnificence of Manhattan’s urban plan. And it’s a unique spot in the heart of the city where the sky and skyline can be seen from street level,” said Jeffrey Inaba, the founder of INABA, in a statement. “The installation is meant to be a place to take in these qualities, as well as to appreciate all of the street activity day and night through its many reflective panels.”

New York Light will open before Thanksgiving and run for one month. Tillotson Design Associates, Ben Gal Fierro, and Buro Happold collaborated with INABA on the project.

New York Light looking north. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light looking north. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light by INABA. (Courtesy INABA)

New York Light by INABA. (Courtesy INABA)

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