Moscow’s Shukhov Tower won’t be dismantled after all

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THE SHUKHOV TOWER. (COURTESY RICHARD PARE)

THE SHUKHOV TOWER. (COURTESY RICHARD PARE)

One of Russia’s most distinctive pieces of architecture—the 1920s-era Shukhov Radio and Television tower in Moscow—has skirted what appeared to be its imminent death.

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THE SHUKHOV TOWER. (COURTESY RICHARD PARE)

Earlier this year, news broke that local authorities planned to dismantle the deteriorating, hyperboloid structure, which was built as a communist communications tower. Russian officials said the structure could possibly be reassembled somewhere else, but preservationists didn’t buy it. And, at the time, leading architects from around the world—including Rem Koolhaas, Thom Mayne, Tadao Ando, and Elizabeth Diller—signed a petition to stop the tower’s demolition.

It’s hard to know exactly what impact that petition had, but something clearly changed in the past few months. The Moscow Times is now reporting that the city has placed the structure on a federal list of protected heritage sites. While this reportedly stops plans to dismantle or relocate the structure, the Shukhov Tower is not entirely in the clear just yet.

The tower has been decaying for years and needs close to $14 million in repairs. “The bureaucratic procedure of drafting documents to preserve buildings … is not a guarantee they will be saved,” Sergei Arsenyev, the vice president of the Shukhov Tower Federation, told the Guardian. “If they don’t allocate money for saving [the] tower, sooner or later it will die.”

[h/t ArchDaily]

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