News
11.12.2012
Tapering Heights
Another tall, skinny residential tower to pierce the sky in Midtown Manhattan.
Cetra Ruddy's 107 57th Street viewed from Central Park.
Courtesy Centra Ruddy

The currently empty lot at 107 West 57th Street will soon be home to one of the city’s narrowest tall buildings. Slated for completion in 2014, a mixed-use tower will rise 688 feet in the air from the modest 43-foot-wide by 100-foot-deep site. Developed by JDS Development Group and designed by local architecture firm Cetra Ruddy, the 51-story residential high rise with retail on the first four floors will fit into Midtown’s zoning envelope, its south face stepping and tapering back from the street as it ascends. The firm also designed One Madison Park, the slim tower of stacked cubes on 23rd Street.

 
107 57th Street.
 

“We wanted to create something that would carry its own weight among the Midtown towers, of which there are many,” said John Cetra, a founding partner of Cetra Rudy. In addition to the building’s slender, shard-like character, the architects have given it an active skin treatment that will catch eyes whether up close or from a distance. While the north and south facades will feature floor-to-ceiling transparent glass curtain walls, the lot-line walls, which contain the tower’s reinforced concrete structure, will be clad with dark grey stainless steel panels. The panels are rippled and perforated with a semi-random pattern of holes, which, at night, will reveal a kinetic display of light from thousands of concealed LEDs. “We’re not just exposing a wall of concrete,” continued Cetra. “It’s going to have quite a personality in and of itself. Whatever direction you see it from, it will sparkle with light.”

Containing a total of 105,000 square feet, 107 West 57th Street will have no more than one apartment per floor, including 13 full-floor units, 14 duplexes, and a four-story penthouse. Two elevators housed in a core of concrete shear walls will provide vertical circulation. A tuned-mass damper in the upper mechanical floors will help to reduce building sway and provide a stable environment for residents.

Aaron Seward