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08.03.2010
Lower Manhattan Shaping Up
For our 6th annual Developer's Issue, we focus on Manhattan below Canal Street, guided by our own fascination -- and admitted confusion -- about the sometimes contradictory forces that have come to characterize the area. Is it a financial district or a residential neighborhood taking full advantage of the waterfront? A tourist magnet or a crowded mess? Are buildings on the rise or paralyzed in place? There's much under way at the World Trade Center, but few seem to understand the development's fine-grained future. Most importantly, it is hardly clear how this latest Lower Manhattan mega-block (and we found there have been quite a few precedents since the 1940s) is going to weave into a rejuvenated street grid at a much different scale. Amid river-to-river renewal, we bring you the fullest picture possible of downtown development.
Joe Woolhead

fumihiko Maki's tower 4.
joe woolhead
 
 

World Trade Center Rising

The heavy-construction hubbub that has consumed this 16-acre site for most of the last decade is finally showing results, with Tower 1's steel now 28 floors above grade and Tower 4 framed up to the sixth. Aaron Seward takes a bedrock-to-bird's-eye tour of Ground Zero and reports on what we can expect from the Port Authority and developer Larry Silverstein in the years to come.

 

 

 


 
lmcc swing space resident ari tabei at 120 broadway.
COURTESY lmcc
 
 

Downtown's Culture Scene

The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council was among the victims of 9/11, losing one of its resident artists and suffering further from the economic downturn that ground philanthropy to a halt. Matt Chaban talks with Sam Miller, the organization's new executive director, about the cultural assets poised for rebirth along with the rest of downtown.

 

 

 

 



frank gehry's beekman tower.
david sundberg/esto
 
 

Residential Revival

The live-in population of Lower Manhattan has more than doubled to 55,000 since 2001, and many buyers are now on the prowl for playgrounds rather than party pads. Jennifer K. Gorsche surveys the shifting real estate landscape, checking in with high-profile new projects like Beekman Tower and Riverhouse.

 

 

  

 

 


 
the alliance for downtown new york's water street plan.
COURTESY alliance for downtown new york
 
 

Greening the Granite Canyon

Along with a growing residential neighborhood comes a new need for parks and public open space. Alan G. Brake reports on the boom in pocket parks and playgrounds, as well as the evolving East River Esplanade and a major new streetscape proposal for Water Street.

 



the 1966 lower manhattan plan.
courtesy princeton architectural press
 

The Planning of Lower Manhattan

Few places in New York have been as intensively masterplanned as Lower Manhattan. William Menking reviews the rise of the superblock and explores the mixed legacy of David Rockefeller's Downtown Lower Manhattan Association.

 

 

 

 

 

 



downtown circa 2018.
courtesy lmccc
 
 

12.31.2018> Lower Manhattan in Development

AN takes a comprehensive snapshot of new residential projects, commercial buildings, parks, schools, and transportation improvements below Canal Street as projected in 2018, logging the developers, architects, and landscape architects at work shaping downtown's future.

 

 

 

 

 

 



the lmccc's "4-D" view of lower manhattan.
courtesy lmccc
 
 

Building a Better Map

In recent months, the Lower Manhattan Construction Command Center has transformed how New Yorkers understand the changes taking place in what is collectively the biggest construction site in the city. Katherine Lindstedt takes a peek behind the scenes of the agency's latest online mapping model and its powerful, publicly accessible database.