Clean Lines

MVRDV creates an almost entirely transparent kitchen for the Venice Biennale

Design International
MVRDV's Infinity Kitchen, almost entirely transparent (Martin Rijpstra)
MVRDV's Infinity Kitchen, almost entirely transparent (Martin Rijpstra)

Currently on display at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale is MVRDV’s Infinity Kitchen.

The invisibility of the design allows a seamless connection between the food product and its place in the kitchen. From the cabinet to the trash receptacles to the sink, almost everything comprising the Infinity Kitchen is clear. The only exceptions are the dishwasher and certain cutlery which Winy Maas, co-founder and Director of MVRDV, hopes to one day convert to transparency as well.

Chef Louis Meisen in MVRDV's Infinity Kitchen (Courtesy of Martin Rijpstra via MVRDV)

Chef Louis Meisen in MVRDV’s Infinity Kitchen (Martin Rijpstra)

The design explores the opportunity for a closer relationship with our food. In the Youtube video below, Winy Maas said: “If we imagine everything is transparent clear and clean, doesn’t it mean that the only thing that is colorful and visible is our food? Doesn’t it then imply that we are encouraged to love the food, in that way, and that maybe it even becomes more healthy, if not sexy?”

This concept of transparency is appears in other MVRDV projects, notably Crystal Houses, a Chanel boutique in Amsterdam. In the facade of the building, glass has been substituted for traditional bricks. Additionally, on June 1, an office in Hong Kong will open designed by MRVDV to have glass interiors, furniture, and equipment.

MVRDV's Infinity Kitchen, almost entirely transparent, at the 2016 Venice Biennale (Courtesy of Martin Rijpstra via MVRDV)

MVRDV’s Infinity Kitchen, almost entirely transparent, at the 2016 Venice Biennale (Martin Rijpstra)

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