Keeping it 100

Jane Jacobs: 100 and Timeless as Ever

City Terrain National Newsletter Urbanism
Jane Jacobs, protesting condemned West Village housing. Her son Ned in the background. (Courtesy Aesthetic Realism)
Jane Jacobs, protesting condemned West Village housing. Her son Ned in the background. (Courtesy Aesthetic Realism)

In most cases, a century provides a round, nostalgic number. It is an arbitrary marker, offering a chance for living generations to contemplate a past beyond their firsthand comprehension.

A century is not just a convenient marker for remembering Jane Jacobs. It is a crucial interval for appreciating the world she grew up in, the urban devastation she witnessed, the forces she fought against, and the future she hoped for. Even as the planning profession has roundly embraced Jacobs’s ideas, the resurrection of the American city remains a work in progress.

This is not your grandmother’s city. But it may yet be.

Though Jacobs passed away 10 years ago and published her masterpiece, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, in 1961, urbanists do not celebrate her for some distant, reverenced work. Contemporary movements such as smart growth, pedestrianism, public transit, New Urbanism, tactical urbanism, and the Millennial sunburst of enthusiasm for urban living all hearken back to Jacobs.



Even so, the historical moment that gave rise to Jacobs is still happening, with the momentum of a nuclear meltdown still spitting out radiation, half-life after half-life. “Orthodox modernist city planning…refuses to die,” said Robert A.M. Stern, dean of the Yale School of Architecture. “She did a very good job of trying to kill it, by turning attention back to city streets and the people who inhabit them.”

When suburbs were swelling and freeways were tearing through cities in the mid-20th century, few planners or architects recognized, or cared, that cities were dying. Planners followed the European model of Le Corbusier and the International Congress of Modern Architecture (CIAM), which advocated the demolition of neighborhoods and the erection of sterile towers and pointless open spaces. In the United States, this program evolved into highways, tract housing, and “urban renewal.”

Jacobs celebrated life, not objects. She was eloquent, rebellious, endearing, and superficially unassuming—in part because she was a woman in a field that was, and remains, dominated by men. A tenacious activist, Jacobs not only lived her ideals but actually prevailed, staring down New York City’s infrastructure czar Robert Moses and saving Greenwich Village from the proposed Lower Manhattan Expressway.

Barrow Street in Greenwich Village (Courtesy Teri Tynes/Flickr)

Barrow Street in Greenwich Village (Courtesy Teri Tynes/Flickr)

Jacobs arrived at her radicalism by looking backwards—and looking around. She uncovered the great things about cities that had been known, if not fully articulated, for millennia. She contended that “scientific” modernist planning and design was little more than a rationalization to justify the enshrinement of (white, male) egotism in the landscape. Jacobs was the real scientist, using powers of observation and deduction to describe what she saw as the natural environment in which urban humans thrived.

“Her only qualifications were her eyes and her social conscience, and she started telling people there is a horrendous gap between your forms and your social ideals,” said architect Stefanos Polyzoides, a co-founder of the Congress for the New Urbanism. “The architectural profession was dominated by this idea that modern is good and everything else is rotten.”

(Jacobs had at least one major like-minded contemporary in sociologist William H. Whyte. Otherwise, Jacobs dominates planning like few have dominated any field. In 2009 the urban planning website Planetizen.com conducted an unscientific poll of history’s 100 “greatest urban thinkers.” Out of 14,000 votes, Jacobs took the top spot with five times as many votes as the runner-up, New Urbanist Andrés Duany.)

It’s almost impossible to point to specific examples of Jacobs’s influence. If anything, Jacobs signifies negation: the absence of a superblock, the highway that was never built. Or she embodies the ephemeral: the evening stroll, the chance encounter, the purchase of a bagel and coffee. “She was really about ways to experience a city rather than what a city was supposed to look like,” said Richard Sennett, professor of sociology at the London School of Economics, who knew Jacobs in her heyday.

The New York City AIDS Memorial, designed by studio a+i and scheduled top open this year, in Greenwich Village. (Image a2t for Studio a+i via New York Times)

Rendering of the New York City AIDS Memorial designed by Brooklyn-based studio a+i and scheduled to open this year in Greenwich Village. (Courtesy a2t for Studio a+i via New York Times)

Today, it is the rare urban designer who gets to develop a city, or even a neighborhood, from scratch. In mature cities, change happens over the course of decades. By working at the level of the discrete parcel or building—for better or worse—and on projects that typically take mere years architects, rather than planners, face more ample and direct opportunities to realize Jacobs’s lessons.

Fifty-five years later, architects are still debating what those lessons are.

Short of Lou Reed, perhaps no one is more closely associated with Greenwich Village than Jacobs is. She is often assumed to be both a preservationist and a historicist, forever promoting bricks and brownstones—likely an unexciting prospect for contemporary designers in pursuit of the new. “Because she defended the Village…by extension she defended the historicity of the city,” said Polyzoides. Jacobs did not, however, explicitly promote a certain architectural style. By embracing diversity, she avoided the fate of her modernist nemeses.

“She’s against singularity and for diversity, diversity of all kinds: economic, social, physical,” said Polyzoides. “In that sense she might be very pleased with a modern or contemporary building in a traditional street.” While Jacobs may have been agnostic about how a building looks, she was anything but when it came to how it relates to its surroundings. Jacobs makes architects think about all the elements of cities that aren’t buildings.

Lorcan O’Herlihy, founding principal of Los Angeles-based Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, said that this perspective compels architects to pay attention to how buildings relate to street life and with surrounding buildings. His design process includes literal interaction: extensive community dialog through which he tries to understand a project’s role in the human environment. While non-residents may never enter a building, its influence still extends, for better or worse, beyond the property line.

Formosa1140—residences which introduced a small public to West Hollywood—by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects (Lawrence Anderson)

Formosa1140—residences which introduced a small public park to West Hollywood—by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects (Lawrence Anderson)

SL11024—housing for faculty, students, and others on the edge of UCLA's campus—by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects (Iwan Baan)

SL11024—housing for faculty, students, and others on the edge of UCLA’s campus—by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects (Iwan Baan)

SL11024 (Iwan Baan)

SL11024 (Iwan Baan)

“It’s not only about buildings, but it’s also about engaging edges,” said O’Herlihy. “That is something that is missing in an urban context when you turn your back to the sidewalk and street.”

That approach calls for a level of creativity that is often considered lacking in American modern design, which Stern calls “a corporate version of the International Style.” Jacobs offers an alternative. She gives architects the opportunity—perhaps even the obligation—to perceive and respond to neighborhoods as they are and not to impose placeless design theories on them.



“Jacobs revered the city as the preeminent site of choice and possibility and she saw architecture’s duty as enabling, not domineering,” said Michael Sorkin, principal of New York-based Michael Sorkin Studio and author of Twenty Minutes in Manhattan. “Her gift to designers was the rejection of fixed formulas in favor of an ever-unfolding dialectic of form and life.”

Just as Jacobs celebrated city life, so might Jacobs-inspired designs be capable of living many lives. “The best way to honor her would actually be…systems of building that are accretive rather than rupturing,” said Richard Sennett, author and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Cambridge University’ sociology department. Sennett cited Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena, who designs buildings with the intention that they will be altered and added to in time.

For all of Jacobs’s focus on the “human scale” of 20th century cities, 21st century cities may be developing at a scale that makes Jacobs seem, if not precious, then at least inadequate. Jacobs has often drawn criticism for not directly addressing social issues such as segregation and poverty, instead referring to them under the broad mantle of diversity.

Mumbai seen from the air (Courtesy Vicchi/Flickr)

Mumbai seen from the air (Courtesy Vicchi/Flickr)

But contemporary mega-cities in the developing world are growing at unprecedented rates. Lagos, Mumbai, Jakarta, and the like, make New York City look like a sleepy hamlet. In these cities, swelling with urban poor, the “sidewalk ballet” isn’t the most pressing issue.

“Of course they’re relevant today, but they’re not the macro problems,” said Thom Mayne, principal of Morphosis. Jacobs’s attention to the street and the neighborhood “doesn’t have anything to do with the 50 percent of the world that ends up in these urban configurations.”

Then again, Saskia Sassen, professor of sociology at Columbia University, suggests that debates over city form and urban details obscure Jacobs’s broader contributions about urban economics. Jacobs’s 1969 Economy of Cities contends that macro-scale productivity, and indeed the capitalist ideal itself, depends on the aggregate of activities that take place on blocks and in neighborhoods.

“Jacobs shows the city as an economic machine, a machine that can process all kinds of elements that are often coming from non-urban settings,” said Sassen. “[In] a suburb or a private, gated corporate office park, you have density, but you don’t have a city.”

New York City from the Empire State Building (Courtesy Jorge Sanz/Flickr)

New York City from the Empire State Building (Courtesy Jorge Sanz/Flickr)

Debating Jacobs’s relevance presents a thorny challenge. In many circles, she has gained as much influence, intellectually at least, as her Modernist counterparts ever did. Nonetheless, the environments that they built still endure. Appealing as they are, Jacobs’s theories remain largely untested even as, 55 years later, no one has arisen to substantially oppose or eclipse her.

“The longevity of her influence is attributable to the fact she spoke all the truth in a straightforward way,” said Stern. “The profession of planning and architecture has not yet caught up with her wisdom because it is still object-fixated and open-space fixated.”

If any century promises to be the Jane Jacobs Century, then, it may not be the past one: in which she spent 84 of her 90 years, wrote seminal texts, and took a wrecking ball to modernism. That may have been prelude. Rather, the Jane Jacobs Century promises to be the current one: in which the urban world from which she departed may—slowly—become more like the one into which she was born.

Related Stories