Triptyque unveils São Paulo’s minhocão garden viaduct plans

Architecture International Landscape Architecture Transportation Urbanism
(Courtesy Triptyque)

(Courtesy Triptyque)

Brazilian and French firm Triptyque has unveiled their plans for a 2.2 mile vegetated viaduct in São Paulo, Brazil. Originally constructed in 1971, the Minhocão viaduct paved the way for modern automotive travel within the city. Now, despite being closed to vehicles between 9.30 p.m. and 6.30 a.m. and on all day Sundays, the area has become the heavily polluted

Pollution and smog around the viaduct (Courtesy Triptyque)

Pollution and smog around the viaduct (Courtesy Triptyque)

Triptyque’s green solution then, is fitting. As the city attempts to reclaim the highway, leasing it out to pedestrians, Triptyque has proposed lining the viaduct with dashes of greenery and vegetation to make it a more inviting space.

(Courtesy Triptyque)

(Courtesy Triptyque)

Working alongside landscaper Guild Blanche, the scheme focuses on the Minhocão Marquise, the area underneath the roadway itself. Here, they envision a communal space for art, sports, and special events, with Triptyque driving home the idea that color and vibrancy are key components of the project. In doing so, they hope to counter the grayness of São Paulo and create a lively and pedestrian-friendly place.

The viaduct in the 1970s catered for the modern ideals of urbanism (Courtesy Triptyque)

The viaduct in the 1970s catered for the modern ideals of urbanism (Courtesy Triptyque)

As part of the plan, the Marquise will be divided into blocks, each located within the 108 foot gaps between each pillar. These blocks will be numbered and labeled as the “posts” corresponding the beaches of Rio de Janeiro.

(Courtesy Triptyque)

(Courtesy Triptyque)

As a result, each block will receive four programs: “culture, food, services and shops.” These activities will be governed by a public-private partnership in which the São Paulo mayor and city authorities will play a curatorial role and oversee the general scheme.

Daylighting plan (Courtesy Triptyque)

Daylighting plan (Courtesy Triptyque)

Light is also an important factor. Due to the nature of the site, little daylight enters the space. Vegetation will have to hangover the edges or be suspended in order to grow. This, however, works in the scheme’s favor with greenery able to to filter 20% of carbon dioxide pollution from the cars above. Plants will be irrigated via a natural water harvesting system, meanwhile residual/excess water will be used to clean the Marquise surface.

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