The Storefront for Art and Architecture’s most recent exhibition features 42 “closed worlds”

Art
"Closed Worlds," an exhibition on view at the Storefront Gallery for Art and Architecture

On view at the Storefront Gallery for Art and Architecture in SoHo: Closed Worlds, 2016. Curated by Lydia Kallipoliti. Storefront for Art and Architecture. Photo by Jake Naughton.

The ubiquitous white box gallery is an attempt to construct a valueless neutral space that has become an internalized universal cliché that says “art.” The Storefront for Art and Architecture was designed by Steven Holl and Vito Acconci to be a space physically open to the city and the street that would fight back against to the usual sealed and closed world of the art gallery. But a new exhibition at The Storefront, titled Closed Worlds, takes on the architectural, design, and engineering of closed systems. It creates an exhibit that is itself a closed world of multiple closed worlds. One enters directly off the Kenmare Street sidewalk and enters a space that is expansive and claustrophobic at the same time.

Closed Worlds, 2016. Curated by Lydia Kallipoliti. Storefront for Art and Architecture.

Closed Worlds, 2016. Curated by Lydia Kallipoliti. Storefront for Art and Architecture. Photo by Jake Naughton.

Its creator and curator Lydia Kallipoliti, along with an impressive research group that includes exhibit designer Natasha Jen from Pentagram, have created an exhibition that highlights 41 historical prototypes of closed worlds and weaves their integration into the reality of today’s daily life. In fact, despite the open façade of the Storefront, the exhibition is almost claustrophobic.

The Ark for Cape Cod, The New Alchemists, Cape Cod, MA, 1976.

The Ark for Cape Cod, The New Alchemy Institute, Cape Cod, MA, 1976. This was one of several ‘arks’ built by the radical environmental and anarchist group “The New Alchemy Institute,” formed by John Todd and William McLarney. This experimental community practiced year-round contained agriculture, aquaculture, and passive solar heating. Pictured here is the ark’s opening in 1976.

Take, for example, the 1976 New Alchemy Institute’s “Ark for Cape Cod.” Fearing an imminent ecological collapse and famine due to run away capitalism, the group designed an interior environment to support a small colony of people. Its design, once only seen in journals like the Whole Earth catalogue, can now be found in quiet, rural Northern California, Vermont, and the survivalist compounds in Eastern Oregon.

"Closed Worlds," an exhibition on view at the Storefront Gallery for Art and Architecture

Closed Worlds, 2016. Lydia Kallipoliti. 42nd prototype installation: Some World Games, Farzin Farzin (Farzin Lotfi­Jam, John Arnold, Sharif Anous). Storefront for Art and Architecture.

The exhibition also features Some World Games, a virtual reality ecosystem by Farzin Farzin that serves as a contemporary 42nd prototype. The project was selected as the winner of Storefront’s Closed Worlds Competition. Closed Worlds is one of the most thoughtful and challenging exhibitions in recent memory of the Storefront and worth leaving the sidewalk. It closes on April 9.

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