The 16th Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Bjarke Ingels, with four accompanying Summer Houses

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The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Bjarke Ingels has come a long way since he designed the Denmark Pavilion, pictured above, for the Shanghai Expo 2010. His eponymous Copenhagen- and New York–based firm BIG, the Bjarke Ingels Group, today deals with skyscrapers and other large-scale projects in major cities around the world. But this summer, the firm will take a step back to design the 16th Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London.

The Greenland National Gallery of Art, designed in 2010. (Courtesy BIG)

The Greenland National Gallery of Art, designed in 2010. (Courtesy BIG)

Each year since 2000, the Serpentine Gallery’s Pavilion Commission selects an architect known “for consistently extending the boundaries of architecture practice,” according to a press release. The selection is intended to introduce “contemporary artists and architects to a wider audience.” Whether Bjarke Ingels needed an introduction is a matter for debate, but he joins other notable architects including Frank Gehry (2008), Zaha Hadid (2010), Peter Zumthor (2011), Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012), Sou Fujimoto (2013), among others, to have the distinction of building a pavilion. Last year’s pavilion was designed by selgascano.

The 3,230-square-foot pavilion will be built and displayed for four months on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn in Kensington Gardens, London. The structure is used as a café during the day and “a forum for learning, debate and entertainment” in the evening. The Gallery claims the pavilion is “one of the top-ten most visited architectural and design exhibitions in the world.” There is no budget for the project, which, this year, will be paid for with the deep pockets of lead sponsor Goldman Sachs and eventual sale of the pavilion structure itself.

Audemars Piguet Museum, designed for Switzerland, 2014. (Courtesy BIG)

Audemars Piguet Museum, designed for Switzerland, 2014. (Courtesy BIG)

“After 15 years, the Pavilion programme has expanded,” Julia Peyton-Jones, director of the Serpentine Galleries, said in a statement. “It now comprises five structures, each designed by an architect of international renown, aged between 36 and 93.”

This year, the Serpentine also announced that four 270-square-foot Summer Houses will be designed by firms from Amsterdam/Lagos, Berlin/New York, Paris, and London. Like Ingels, each Summer House winner works across architectural scales, from pavilions to skyscrapers.

“The Pavilion, which will be situated on the lawn of the Serpentine Gallery, as usual, will be joined by four 25sqm Summer Houses designed in response to Queen Caroline’s Temple, a classical-style summer house built in 1734,” Peyton-Jones continued. “All projects have been thrilling to commission and will be equally exciting to realise. We cannot wait to unveil them all this summer.”

The four winning firms for the Summer House program are: Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ, Barkow Leibinger, Yona Friedman, and Asif Khan.

“The four Summer Houses are inspired by the nearby Queen Caroline’s Temple, a classical style summer house, built in 1734 and a stone’s throw from the Serpentine Gallery,” a press release about the Summer Houses reads. “In line with the criteria for the selection of the Pavilion architect, each architect chosen by the Serpentine has yet to build a permanent building in England.”

The Summer House program will be submitted to Westminster City Council Planning Office and District Surveyor’s Office this month for review.

View examples of the winning firms’ pavilion-scale work below.

Black Rhino Academy, Tanzania, 2014, Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ. (Courtesy Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ)

Black Rhino Academy, Tanzania, 2014, Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ. (Courtesy Kunlé Adeyemi – NLÉ)

According to the Serpentine Gallery:

Kunlé Adeyemi (born 7 April 1976) is a Nigerian architect, urbanist and creative researcher. His recent work includes ‘Makoko Floating School’, an innovative, prototype, floating structure located on the lagoon heart of Nigeria’s largest city, Lagos. This acclaimed project is part of an extensive research project – ‘African Water Cities’ – being developed by NLÉ, an architecture, design and urbanism practice founded by Adeyemi in 2010 with a focus on developing cities and communities. NLÉ is currently developing a number of urban, research and architectural projects, including Rock – Chicago Lakefront Kiosk; Chicoco Radio Media Centre; Port Harcourt and Black Rhino Academy in Tanzania. Born and raised in Nigeria, Adeyemi studied architecture at the University of Lagos where he began his early practice, before joining Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in 2002. At OMA he led the design, development and execution of several large prestigious projects around the world. Adeyemi is a juror for RIBA’s 2016 International Prize and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University, New York.

Fellows Pavilion, American Academy in Berlin, 2015, Barkow Leibinger. (Stefan Muller)

Fellows Pavilion, American Academy in Berlin, 2015, Barkow Leibinger. (Stefan Muller)

According to the Serpentine Gallery:

Barkow Leibinger is an American/German architectural practice based in Berlin and New York, founded in 1993 by Frank Barkow (born 1957, Kansas City) and Regine Leibinger (born 1963, Stuttgart). Both taught at the Architectural Association in London and Harvard GSD, among other instutions. Regine Leibinger is Professor for Building Construction and Design at the Technische Universität Berlin. Barkow Leibinger’s work is wide ranging in scale and building types, including building for the work place (industry, office and master-planning), cultural, housing, exhibitions and installations. Important milestones are the Biosphere in Potsdam, Germany; the Gate House and the Campus Restaurant in Ditzingen; Germany, the Trutec Building in Seoul, Korea, and the Tour Total office high-rise in Berlin. Recently completed is the Fellows Pavilion for the American Academy in Berlin. Their work has been shown at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2008 and 2014, the Marrakech Biennale 2012 and is included in the collections of MoMA, New York and other museums. They have won numerous awards such as the Marcus Prize for Architecture; three National AIA Honor Awards for Architecture; the DAM Prize for Architecture and a Global Holcim Innovation Award for sustainability.

Drawings of La Ville Spatiale, 1958, Yona Friedman. (Courtesy Yona Friedman Archives)

Drawings of La Ville Spatiale, 1958, Yona Friedman. (Courtesy Yona Friedman Archives)

According to the Serpentine Gallery:

Yona Friedman (born 1923) is a Hungarian-born French architect. His theory and manifesto L’Architecture Mobile, published in 1958, champions the inhabitant as designer and conceptor of his own living space within spaceframe structures. Friedman’s work, developed to facilitate improvisation, influenced avant-garde groups such the Metabolists and Archigram. His projects have included the College Bergson in Angers, France; the Museum for Simple Technology in Madras, India, for which he received the Scroll of Honour for Habitat from the UN; and other projects for which he received the Architecture Award of the Berlin Academy, the Grand Prize for design of the Prime Minister of Japan and many other international honours. Universities where he has taught include Harvard, Columbia, MIT, Princeton and Berkeley. He has participated in the Venice Biennale three times (2003, 2005, 2009) and the Shanghai Biennale in 2004, among others. He has been, and continues to be, the subject of international exhibitions,  the latest of which took place in 2015 at the Power Station Museum of Art in Shanghai. Hundreds of articles and more than forty books have been published about him. Most recently he was voted by Blueprint Magazine readers as the winner of the 2015 Blueprint Magazine Award for Critical Thinking.

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion, London, UK, 2012, Asif Khan. (Hufton + Crow)

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion, London, UK, 2012, Asif Khan. (Hufton + Crow)

According to the Serpentine Gallery:

Asif Khan (born 1979, London) founded his architecture practice in 2007. The studio works internationally on projects ranging from cultural buildings to houses, temporary pavilions, exhibitions and installations. Notable projects include the ‘MegaFaces’ pavilion at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion at London 2012 Olympics and most recently he was a finalist in the competition for the Helsinki Guggenheim Museum and the British Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Red Dot award for Design, Cannes Lion Grand Prix for Innovation, a D&AD award, Special citation in Young Architect Programme 2011 MAXXI + MoMA/PS1, Design Miami Designer of the Future in 2011 and Design Museum Designer in Residence 2010. Khan lectures globally on his work, sits on the board of Trustees of the Design Museum and teaches MA Architecture at the Royal College of Art.

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