London’s Frieze Art Fair opens a second pavilion by Universal Design Studio after successful 2014 show

Architecture Art International
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The Frieze Art Fair looks to capitalize on the 55,000 people who thronged a pavilion by Universal Design Studio (UDS) last year by commissioning another. The five-day festival is held in Regent’s Park, London every October.

(Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

(Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

Starting in 2003, Frieze London has quickly grown to become one of the world’s foremost art fairs. A New York outpost began in 2012, held each May on Randall’s Island, Manhattan.

Looking out from the space. (Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

Looking out from the space. (Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

For the 2015 pavilion, UDS has used the main construction components of Frieze—membrane, steel, board, and aluminum—to create an appropriate temporary structure. New to the fair this year is a Reading Room which offers a diverse selection of art publications and hosts live events.

To entice people into the space, Frieze has collaborated with Petersham Nurseries Restaurant for a pop-up cafe and bar on the mezzanine level overlooking the fair.

Planting on display (Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

Planting on display (Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

Aside from the gallery spaces, the design team has sought to give these areas purpose and identity, bringing the park into the surrounding vicinity. This was achieved with the help of careful planting by Hattie Fox of Shoreditch-based That Flower Shop. Clever uses of visual framing emphasize views and encourage people walking through the fair to enter various spaces.

We were keen to find ways of bringing the park into the Fair,” Jason Holley, a director at UDS, said in a statement. “We achieved this by creating an entrance experience which is in dialogue with the tree canopy, framing and drawing attention to the transition between the Park and Frieze, and through the creation of windows within the restaurant areas that offer glimpses into the park. We are also incorporating planters throughout the Fair which are carefully curated arrangements of plants that directly reference the type of planting found in the park.

The interior (Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

“Much of our focus in this respect has been on creating a logical flow around the Fair, with widened aisles, connections and turning points – punctuating the journey with the formation of pause points – moments of change,” Hanna Carter-Owers, director at UDS, said in a statement. “The galleries are doing a huge volume of business at the Fair and there needs to be consideration to how people and galleries work within the space.”

(Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

(Courtesy Andrew Meredith)

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