James Corner Field Operations unveils initial plans for The Underline, a 10-mile linear park in Miami

Architecture Art East Landscape Architecture Urbanism
Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

It has become common fair to refer to any and all rails-to-trails project as a certain city’s “High Line. ” (Yup, we’ve been guilty of that too.) The ubiquitous High Line comparison might be flattering, but it’s obviously too simplistic. It glosses over site-specific details and rings a bit too New York–centric.

Hammock Trail. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Hammock Trail. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

With that said, it would be best to mention Miami’s planned 10-mile (non-elevated) park without namechecking the gold standard up north. But the Magic City is really asking for it with this one. First, it is called “The Underline.” And second, High Line co-designer James Corner Field Operations has been tapped to oversee it.

Field Operations and Friends of the Underline recently unveiled conceptual renderings of the linear park which runs underneath the city’s elevated Metrorail. The plan envisions two pathways—one for cyclists and one for pedestrians—that run through a network of small parks, seating areas, and kiosks. In this sense, the Underline is designed to be a transportation corridor, less like the High Line and more like Chicago’s recently opened 606.

Curbed Miami reported that “Landscaping, consisting of low-maintenance native species, would be divided into ecosystems reflective of South Florida’s natural setting: a pine rocklands, hardwood hammocks, and wet prairies.”

Grove Gallery. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Grove Gallery. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

The exposed concrete supports underneath the Metrorail tracks would also be used as mile markers and, in some sections, canvasses for murals.

The Real Deal reported that Friends of the Underline hopes to eventually fund the project with a mix of private and public donations. In the meantime, the project continues to garner interest—and financial support. This week, ArtPlace America—a national non-profit that supports arts initiative—announced that the project had been selected for a $200,000 grant. This money will go into the planning process, and follows a recent $250,000 grant from the Knight Foundation.

University of Miami Colonnade. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

University of Miami Colonnade. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Brickell Backyard. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Brickell Backyard. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

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