New Jersey goes Brooklyn with new sustainable food hall

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Outdoor beer garden.  (Courtesy MABU Design)

Outdoor beer garden. (Courtesy MABU Design)

You can’t keep artisanal pickles, earthy micro-brews, and locally-sourced popsicle sticks in Brooklyn forever. At a certain point, these gluten-free, all-vegan treats are going to want to explore the world beyond Williamsburg. Like so many Brooklyn residents before them, they’re headed for New Jersey

Rooftop farm. (Courtesy MABU Design)

Rooftop farm. (Courtesy MABU Design)

No, the Brooklyn Flea isn’t relocating to the Garden State, but Inhabitat reported that a pre-World War I warehouse and adjacent lot in Long Branch is being transformed into a very Brooklyn-esque food hall and beer garden. According to the site, the 14,500-square-foot space has a rooftop garden and small batch brewery that will churn out “nano-brews.” Aside from those tiny beers, the so-called Whitechapel Projects will also have community and arts spaces.

Art space.  (Courtesy MABU Design)

Art space. (Courtesy MABU Design)

Fittingly, the project comes courtesy of some Brooklyn architects and designers including RAFT Landscape Architecture, Matt Burgermaster of Mabu Design, David Cunningham Architecture Planning, and Brooklyn Grange, which operates “the world’s largest rooftop soil farms.” The Asbury Park Press reported that bricks and timbers from the existing warehouse will be repurposed for the project and that an old elevator shaft will be preserved and topped with lights.

Outdoor beer garden.  (Courtesy MABU Design)

Outdoor beer garden. (Courtesy MABU Design)

As Inhabitat explained, the multipurpose space could do more than dish up beers and artisanal snacks—it could have a significant economic impact for the Jersey Shore: “The Whitechapel Projects’ progressive-minded mission combined with a prime beachside location is expected to be immensely supportive to the local economy of Long Branch, New Jersey, a previously grief-stricken area post-Sandy.” The project is expected to open next summer.  

The site at night.  (Courtesy MABU Design)

The site at night. (Courtesy MABU Design)

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